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Veneers

Dental veneers are a form of cosmetic dentistry in which a shell or layer of tooth-colored porcelain or composite material is placed over the facial surfaces of your teeth to correct worn tooth enamel, uneven tooth alignment or spacing, discoloration and chips or cracks.

Although dental veneers fall into the category of cosmetic dentistry because they create bright, white smiles with beautifully aligned, shapely teeth, they also protect the surface of damaged teeth and may eliminate the need for more extensive treatments. Other benefits of veneers include durability, an improved smile appearance, and the need for little-to-no removal of tooth structure compared to crowns.

Six step process for applying Veneers:

  1. Removal of any decay and old fillings on the tooth.
  2. Make room for the veneer by removing a small amount of enamel.
  3. Determine the shape, size and shade of the tooth by taking an impression of the prepped tooth.
  4. Send the impression of your tooth to a dental lab where the veneer is made
  5. Make and place temporary veneer while waiting for the permanents to come back from the lab.
  6. Check the color, size and shape of permanent veneer to ensures a proper fit Shaped, polished and apply permanent veneer. 

Regardless of what causes unattractive teeth, dental veneers may solve most or even all of your cosmetic dental issues, including:

  • Worn enamel: Over time, the thin, hard translucent substance covering your teeth (enamel) may become worn, dulled and discolored. Such wear and discoloration may be natural or result from a genetic predisposition. However, it often results from consuming soft drinks, tea or coffee; smoking; using certain medications, etc.
  • Wear and tear: Teeth naturally wear down as people age. Aged teeth are more likely to have chips, cracks or a generally uneven appearance.
  • Genetics: Certain people are born with abnormal spacing between their teeth that widens with age.
  • Uneven teeth: Uneven teeth can result from tooth grinding or general wear and tear.